Human Japanese: Extra Credit

Reading, listening, and sentence construction practice based on grammar and vocabulary learned in Human Japanese.

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Drill yourself on sentences that use various forms of desu.
Notes: This exercise also illustrates how nouns can be either singular or plural, and that subjects are often omitted from Japanese sentences.
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Standard Unread 1.8(422 votes)
No Katakana Unread 2.0(67 votes)
Combine vocabulary for things found around the house with the patterns learned in the previous lesson.
Notes: This exercise uses every vocabulary word presented in Human Japanese Chapter 8.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.1(233 votes)
No Katakana Unread 2.3(34 votes)
Pro
Put your counting skills through their paces in both directions with this numerically-oriented drill.
Notes: Remember to keep your wits about you when you get over 10,000!
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.3(98 votes)
Pro
Practice your vocabulary for words like "today," "next month," and "September" in sentences using grammar learned in previous chapters.
Notes: This chapter also utilizes the newly learned words for "good" and the agreement-seeking particle ne.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.9(79 votes)
No Katakana Unread 2.1(18 votes)
Pro
The addition of the question marker ka unlocks lots of new sentences. Drill yourself here.
Notes: This chapter also utilizes the newly-introduced word sou, "so/that way."
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.9(69 votes)
No Katakana Unread 2.1(15 votes)
Pro
Combine the new words from this vocab-centric chapter with previously learned patterns in nearly 60 test sentences.
Notes: This chapter also includes a note about yes-or-no responses to negative questions, like "Isn't it a restaurant?"
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.9(57 votes)
Pro
With the addition of wa to our language toolbox, we can suddenly create much longer sentences.
Notes: This chapter also introduced the pluralizer -tachi.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.0(49 votes)
Pro
Drill yourself on the food-related vocab from this chapter, combined with the patterns for saying you like or dislike something.
Notes: This episode exercises all the new vocabulary learned in Human Japanese Chapter 17.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.0(45 votes)
Pro
Test your grasp of words like "this," "that," "here," "there," and many others.
Notes: This chapter also introduced a polite way to refer to a person when introducing them.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.8(37 votes)
Pro
Sharpen your pencils and sit up straight for this review of school-related vocabulary.
Notes: This chapter also introduced the way to name a year in school, as well as the names of many countries.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.0(36 votes)
Pro
Prove that you've nailed no by working through these example sentences.
Notes: This particle also allowed us to make sense of the words for "boy" and "girl."
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.9(33 votes)
Pro
Test yourself on the "big five" verb forms: positive, negative, present, and past, plus the "let's do" form.
Notes: In this chapter, we also learned to use the -te form to create requests.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.9(34 votes)
Pro
Make sure you get where you're going with this crucial particle.
Notes: We also learned how to create phrases like "on Thursday" or "in September" with the same particle.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.1(33 votes)
Pro
The object-marker wo is the key to using verbs that do something to something else (e.g., "She drank the water"). Make sure you've got it securely under your belt by running through these example sentences.
Notes: This article also contains a discussion of why the patterns for liking and disliking things seem to break the rules.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.8(37 votes)
Pro
Test your mettle with arimasu/imasu and a new use of ni.
Notes: This chapter also introduced two ways to create lists of items.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.0(31 votes)
Pro
In this vocab-centric chapter, we learned about how to refer to family members within the family and when speaking to someone outside the family.
Notes: In this chapter, we also learned the words for "boyfriend" and "girlfriend," which happen to be the same words as for "he" and "she."
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.0(30 votes)
Pro
In this vocabulary-building chapter, we learned the words for various leisure activities.
Notes: We also learned a few patterns for using the new vocabulary, such as the way to talk about "going for a walk" or "going on a drive."
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.0(20 votes)
Pro
Drill on phrases like "on top of the desk" and "in front of the school" to make sure you've got everything securely "inside your head."
Notes: This chapter also introduced a handful of new vocabulary words like ue, shita, mae, ushiro, and so on.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.1(15 votes)
Pro
Review the new verbs introduced in Chapter 29.
Notes: Also includes drills for the particle mo.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.9(14 votes)
Pro
Get to the bottom of the who, what, when, where, why, and how with this drill.
Notes: Now you can finally find out who ate those leftovers in the fridge you had your eyes on!
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.1(18 votes)
Pro
Rediscover the simple joy of naming how many things there are with nearly fifty sentences.
Notes: Drill on the tsu numbers plus counters for people; sheets; smallish and roundish objects; long cylindrical objects; and small animals.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.9(15 votes)
Pro
Add the counters for time and dates to become a calendar master.
Notes: This lesson also drills on ages and prices.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.1(10 votes)
Pro
Drill yourself on the various different ways of using putting together contradictory thoughts.
Notes: Uses the words shikashi, demo, ga, keredomo, keredo, and kedo.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.9(12 votes)
Pro
Review the first of the three classes of adjective-like words: conjugating adjectives.
Notes: We also learned about nai and how it can create and informal version of dewa arimasen.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.0(12 votes)
Pro
Nail down the remaining two categories of adjective-like words: no adjectives (which are actually nouns), and na adjectives.
Notes: This review also provides guidance on what to do if you can't remember if a word is a na or no adjective.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.9(10 votes)
Pro
Go adjective-crazy in this review of vocabulary from chapter 35.
Notes: Also includes a review of adjectives from chapter 34.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.7(11 votes)
Pro
Armed with the adjectives from the previous chapters and a few new ones, charge through town pointing out everyone's long legs, short fingers, big ears, slender waists, and more.
Notes: This lesson also provides a chance to drill on the use of "ornamental desu" after a conjugating adjective.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.2(11 votes)
Pro
Practice asking and reporting about various health concerns and their remedies.
Notes: Includes lots of hospital vocabulary.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.0(10 votes)
Pro
Drill on sentences that exercise the patterns for saying some one "is" or "is not," or "was" or "was not" doing something.
Notes: This episode also includes two sentences that utilize "contrastive wa," with notes to break it down.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 1.9(14 votes)
Pro
Combine new vocabulary for clothing with the progressive forms to talk about what everyone is wearing.
Notes: Also contains notes about variants of certain color words.
Editions Status Difficulty
Standard Unread 2.0(8 votes)