My Sweetie Is Japanese

Explores everyday Japanese culture as seen through the eyes of a foreigner married to a Japanese woman. (This series is an homage to the wonderful manga ダーリンは外国人, My Darling is a Foreigner.)

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The narrator introduces his wife, a modern and cosmopolitan woman who is also very particular about certain traditional foods.
Notes: This article is written in an upbeat and polite style that feels like Japanese you might hear in a public speaking situation (for example, a TED talk). It features polite verbs and straightforward, well-formed sentences. Direct quotations of story characters reflect more casual speech.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 7129
Japanese families can be quite self-deprecating, which can sometimes lead to awkward moments.
Notes: Featuring well-formed sentences and straightforward grammar, this article contains useful vocabulary relating family life and marriage.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 3727
Pro
The narrator is caught off-balance by his mother-in-law's comment, leading to an uneasy moment.
Notes: This article contains excellent vocabulary and expressions, such as "lines (that an actor might deliver)" and "making a (funny, angry, happy, etc) face."
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 1632
Pro
Getting to know your spouse's parents can always be a little nerve-wracking. But are you ready for some one-on-one naked time with your new father-in-law?
Notes: This article contains straightforward grammar plus a few useful cultural tidbits.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 1187
Pro
The narrator heads to the onsen with his wife's father.
Notes: This article contains lots of useful vocabulary, such as the words for imitating someone, soaking in a tub, and heading somewhere.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 1004
Pro
The narrator enjoys a quiet moment and reflects on his journey into Japanese culture.
Notes: This article should be mostly straightforward, but the last paragraph, with its reflection on lessons learned, might be slightly more challenging.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 875
Pro
Our narrator discovers that while Japan is in some respects very modern, in other ways it can still be quite traditional.
Notes: This episode contains lots of useful vocabulary and grammar notes, such as ones about the word hazu, the pattern for "assisting" someone with a task, and a common way of saying you are confident in your abilities.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 909
Pro
The narrator experiences the eye-popping volume of food that is a traditional Japanese breakfast.
Notes: This article contains lots of good vocabulary, including a breakdown of two similarly-named dish types, as well as a discussion of the gurai that means "just about only."
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 807
Pro
The narrator is simultaneously nervous and excited about meeting the gang from his wife's former office.
Notes: This episode contains two extensive notes, one about different words that refer to polite language, and one about the "storytelling present."
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 457
Pro
The narrator learns an important lesson about speaking as peers for the evening.
Notes: This episode contains a note on the word sasuga, as well as a long breakdown of bureikou and some tips for partaking responsibly.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 373
Pro
The narrator considers the reluctance of Japanese people to use English.
Notes: This episode contains notes on the use of wa after an amount, plus a breakdown of a very challenging sentence.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 415
Pro
The narrator relates an experience that sheds light on his question.
Notes: This episode contains a note on the word sore-zore, plus a breakdown of a long sentence with two special uses of wa.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 327
Pro
The narrator lays out his answer to the original question.
Notes: This episode contains a note that analyzes the essay to determine what the author's main point is.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 302
Pro
The narrator marvels over food quality at various establishments.
Notes: This episode demonstrates a useful suffix that means "freshly-; just- (made, etc)."
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 300
Pro
The narrator arrives at an ideas about why Japanese restaurants are so good.
Notes: This episode contains a note that breaks down a long sentence, as well as one that takes up the pattern sono X, sono X and a derivative of it.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 263
Pro
The narrator gets a lesson on an important part of the New Year's holiday.
Notes: This episode contains lots of interesting cultural notes.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 247
Pro
The narrator grapples with what to think of this custom, but putting himself in the place of the kids helps him to come to terms with it.
Notes: This episode contains a great example of the word mon/mono being used in a special sense.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 226
Pro
The narrator describes a surprise he experienced on his birthday.
Notes: This episode contains notes on an expression that means "to nearly (do something)" and a use of the word tonikaku for emphasis.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 296
The end of the year is not just a time for holidays, as narrator discovers.
Notes: This episode contains an expression that means "to involve an innocent bystander in a (usually tragic) event," and two long notes that look at sentences with omitted components.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 251
Pro
The narrator relates the consequences of differing cultural expectations related to hosting and hospitality.
Notes: This episode contains several less-common vocabulary words, such as one that means "to entertain guests with food and drink" and another that means "to prepare food in advance."
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 277
Pro
The narrator and his wife meet in the middle.
Notes: This episode contains a note on the interesting expression nan nara, a way of avoiding being too direct.
Editions Status Total Readers
Standard Unread 77